Thriding

Month: July, 2012

The head-to-head records for the Olympic R16

Top quarter

Federer vs Istomin

  • head to head: 2-0 (Most recent: Cincinnati 2010)
  • ranking: 1 vs 35
  • Wimbledon 2012: W – R16
  • Istomin’s big win recently was Ferrer at Indian Wells

Tipsarevic vs Isner 

  • head to head: 1-0 (Vienna 2009)
  • ranking: 8 vs 11
  • Wimbledon 2012: R32 vs R128
  • Isner has three wins over top 10 this year: Federer in Davis Cup (Feb), Djokovic at Indian Wells (Mar) and Tsonga in DC (Apr). No top 20 wins since losing Houston final to Monaco (Apr)

2nd quarter

Ferrer vs Nishikori

  • head to head: 1-1 (Ferrer, Tokyo 2011)
  • ranking: 5 vs 17
  • Wimbledon 2012: QF vs R32
  • Nishikori’s win against Ferrer was at the 2008 US Open. His ony win of any significance was against Tsonga at the Australian Open. Highest ranked win since then: Ramos (42) at Monte Carlo

Del Potro vs Simon

  • head to head: 2-2 (Simon, US Open 2011)
  • ranking: 9 vs 13
  • Wimbledon 2012: R16 vs R64
  • Del Potro beat Simon at Wimbledon 2011. Simon beat Tipsarevic and Tsonga at Monte Carlo, but has only beaten Fognini and Young in the top 50 since then.

3rd quarter

Murray vs Baghdatis

  • head to head: 4-3 (Murray, Wimbledon 2012)
  • ranking: 4 vs 45
  • Wimbledon 2012: RU vs R32 
  • Baghdatis’ only win vs Murray in last five years was Rotterdam 2011, when Murray was having a long run of bad form after the Australian Open final

Almagro vs Darcis

  • head to head: 3-0 (Nice, 2012)
  • ranking: 12 vs 75
  • Wimbledon 2012: R32 vs R128
  • Until he beat Berdych in the opening round in London 2012, his best wins had been Troicki at Delray Beach and Baghdatis at Eastbourne

Bottom quarter

Djokovic vs Hewitt

  • head to head: 5-1 (Djokovic, Australian Open 2012)
  • ranking: 2 vs 159
  • Wimbledon 2012: SF vs R128
  • Hewitt hasn’t beaten Djokovic since US Open 2006

Tsonga vs Lopez

  • head to head: 3-0 (Shanghai 2010)
  • ranking: 6 vs 29
  • Wimbledon 2012: SF vs R128
  • Tsonga beat Lopez at Wimbledon 2007. Lopez’ only top 30 win this year was Isner at AO.

Blog index

 

Nadal’s results in the lulls between his annual runs of success

Just as Nadal has stretches of intense success, he also has lulls. My previous post on Nadal included details of his annual run of success. Here are the lulls in between them, and what Nadal acheived in them:

1. Between Madrid 2005 and Dubai 2006 (4 months)

Nadal had had a very successful 2005, winning tournaments throughout the year.

The only tournament Nadal played in this gap was Marseille, a fortnight before Dubai. He reached the SF, losing to Clement. He missed the Australian Open 2006 through injury.

2. Between Roland Garros 2006 and Indian Wells 2007 (8 months)

2006 had started well: he beat Federer at the Dubai final, and then won his usual quartet of clay titles (MC, Barcelona, Rome, RG)

  • Queens, QF, lost to Hewitt
  • Wimbledon, F, lost to Federer
  • Toronto, R16, lost to Berdych
  • Cincinnati, QF, JC Ferrero
  • US Open, QF, Youzhny
  • Stockholm, R16, J Johansson
  • Madrid, QF, Berdych
  • YEC, SF, Federer
  • AO, QF, Gonzalez
  • Dubai, QF, Youzhny

Six of out ten tournaments ended at QF for him, with just one RU, and one SF

3. Between Madrid Stuttgart 2007 and Monte Carlo 2008 (9 months)

Stuttgart 2007 was the last post-Roland Garros tournament that Nadal played. It was soon after he lost in 5 sets to Federer in the Wimbledon final

  • Montreal, SF, Djokovic
  • Cincinnati, R32, Monaco (ret.)
  • US Open, R16, Ferrer
  • Madrid, QF, Nalbandian
  • Paris, F, Nalbandian
  • YEC, SF, Federer
  • Chennai, F, Youzhny
  • AO, SF, Tsonga
  • Rotterdam, R16, Seppi
  • Dubai, QF, Roddick
  • Indian Wells, SF, Djokovic
  • Miami, F, Davydenko

In this run of 12 tournaments he reached 3 finals, 4 SF, 2 QF

4. Between Olympics 2008 and Australian Open 2009 (5 months)

2008 was one of Nadal’s most successful years, in which he won Wimbledon as well as the French Open, and then the Canadian Masters for a second time and Olympic gold. The lull that followed it was more of a catching of breath than anything else:

  • US Open, SF, Murray
  • Madrid, SF, Simon
  • Paris, QF, Davydenko
  • Doha, QF, Monfils

Only four tournaments in this lull, difficult to see any pattern, but can note that there weren’t any pre-QF losses this time

5. Between Rome 2009 and Monte Carlo 2010 (11 months)

2009 was the only year in which Nadal won two hard court titles before the clay season: the Australian Open and Indian Wells. The clay season came to halt with the long SF victory over Djokovic at Madrid. After this came the losses to Federer and Soderling, and Nadal was unable to defend his Wimbledon title.

  • Madrid, F, Federer
  • RG, R16, Soderling
  • Montreal, QF, Del Potro
  • Cincinnati, SF, Djokovic
  • US Open, SF, Del Potro
  • Beijing, SF, Cilic
  • Shanghai, F, Davydenko
  • Djokovic, SF, Paris
  • YEC, RR, (3 x L)
  • Doha, F, Davydenko
  • AO, QF, Murray
  • Indian Wells, SF, Ljubicic
  • Miami, SF, Roddick

Aside from the shock loss to Soderling at Roland Garros and the poor performance at the YEC, there were no pre-QF losses: at the other 11 tournaments there were 3 finals, 6 SF, 2 QF

6. Between Tokyo 2010 and Monte Carlo 2011 (6 months)

2010 had been another of Nadal’s exceptional years, and he went one further than 2008, in that he won the US Open as well as Wimbledon and Roland Garros. Once the run came to an end in Shanghai, the results were generally still strong:

  • Shanghai, R16, Melzer
  • YEC, F, Federer
  • Doha, SF, Davydenko
  • AO, QF, Ferrer
  • Indian Wells, F, Djokovic
  • Miami, F, Djokovic

In just six tournaments Nadal reached 3 finals, with just the one poor result in Shanghai. The loss to Ferrer in the Australian Open QF was in straight sets, and Nadal took a long rest afterwards.

7. Between Roland Garros 2011 and Monte Carlo 2012 (11 months)

2011 is already remember as the year in which Djokovic raised himself emphatically over Nadal, though what might have happened between at Roland Garros will never be known. 

  • Queens, QF, Tsonga
  • Wimbledon, F, Djokovic
  • Montreal, R32, Dodig
  • Cincinnati, QF, Fish
  • US Open, F, Djokovic
  • Tokyo, F, Murray
  • Shanghai, R16, Mayer
  • YEC, RR, (2 x L)
  • Doha, SF, Monfils
  • AO, F, Djokovic
  • Indian Well, SF, Federer
  • Miami, SF, Murray (w/o)

In these 12 tournaments there are 4 finals (the most in any lull) 3 SFs, 2 QFs and 2 pre-QF losses

8. Since Roland Garros 2012 (2 months)

In the clay-court season Nadal reasserted himself over Djokovic, at least on that surface, beating him at Monte Carlo, Rome and Roland Garros.

Since then he has played just two tournaments: his traditional pre-Wimbledon QF at Halle (Kohlschreiber) and then the big shock:

  • Wimbledon, R64, Rosol

The average of the seven completed lulls has been seven and a half months long and has contained eight tournaments

In order of length:

  • 5. 2009/10, 11 months, 13 tournaments, 3 finals, 6 SFs, 2 QFs, 2 pre-QF
  • 7. 2011/12, 11 months, 12 tournaments, 4 finals, 3 SFs, 2 QFs, 2 pre-QF
  • 3. 2007/08, 9 months, 12 tournaments, 3 finals, 4 SFs, 2 QFs, 3 pre-QF
  • 2. 2006/07, 8 months, 10 tournaments, 1 final, 1 SF, 6 QFs, 2 pre-QF
  • 6. 2010/11, 6 months, 6 tournaments, 3 finals, 1 SF, 1 QF, 1 pre-QF
  • 4. 2008/09, 5 months, 4 tournaments, 0 finals, 2 SFs, 2 QFs, 0 pre-QF
  • 1. 2005/6, 4  months, 1 tournament, 0 finals, 1 SF, 0 QFs, 0 pre-QF

The longest was after the knee-Soderling combination, the second longest thanks to Djokovic’s run from AO 2011 to AO 2012. Next come the two lulls after losing in the Wimbledon final. Then the two lulls after multi-slam streaks, and finally the short injury-ridden lull after his first year of great success. 

    Blog index

     

    The fringes of the Top 10 in 2012

    For all of 2012 Nos.1-4 have been Djokovic, Federer, Nadal and Murray

    For all of 2012 Nos. 5-7 have been Ferrer, Tsonga and Berdych

    At the start of the year the the last three places of the top 10, and the next three places were:

    • 8. Fish
    • 9. Tipsarevic
    • 10. Almagro
    • 11. Del Potro
    • 12. Simon
    • 13. Soderling

    After the Australian Open Monfils replaced Soderling’s place in this 8-13 bracket, and then he in turn was replaced by Isner. As of today, thanks to winning the Hamburg ATP500, Monaco has jumped to No.10, pushing Simon (last year’s winner of Hamburg) out of this bracket.

    First a comparison of the statistics of the six players currently ranked 8-13, and then, under that some conclusions

    8. Tipsarevic

    • Started 2012 at: 9
    • During 2012: Nos. 8-10
    • Top 10 in 2012: 30 weeks
    • 2012 win-loss: 39-15
    • 2012 slams: R32 / R16 / R32 
    • 2012 Masters: Madrid SF, Miami QF
    • 2012 titles: World Team Championship, Stuttgart
    • career finals: 3-7
    • Masters: 2 SFs
    • Slam: 1 QF

    9. Del Potro

    • Started 2012 at: 11
    • During 2012: Nos. 9-12 
    • Top 10 in 2012: 20 weeks
    • 2012 win-loss: 40-10
    • 2012 slams: QF / QF / R16
    • 2012 Masters:  Madrid SF, Indian Wells QF
    • 2012 titles: Marseille, Estoril
    • career finals: 11-5 (1 GS, 3 ATP500s)
    • Masters: 1 RU, 4 SFs
    • Slams: 1 W, 1 SF, 4 QFs

    10. Monaco

    • Started 2012 at: 26
    • During 2012: Nos. 10-29  
    • Top 10 in 2012: 1 week
    • 2012 win-loss: 31-10
    • 2012 slams: R128 / R16 / R32
    • 2012 Masters: Miami SF
    • 2012 titles: Vina del Mar, Houston, Hamburg 500
    • career finals: 6-9 (2 ATP500s)
    • Masters: 2 SF
    • Slams: never beyond R16

    11. Isner

    • Started 2012 at: 18
    • During 2012: Nos. 9-18  
    • Top 10 in 2012: 11 weeks
    • 2012 win-loss: 30-13 
    • 2012 slams: R32 / R64 / R128
    • 2012 Masters: Indian Wells RU
    • 2012 titles: Newport
    • career finals: 4-7
    • Masters: 1 RU, 1 SF
    • Slams: 1 QF

    12. Almagro

    • Started 2012 at: 10
    • During 2012: Nos. 10-14 (only 1 week at 14)
    • Top 10 in 2012: 5 weeks
    • 2012 win-loss: 46-15
    • 2012 slams: R16 / QF / R32
    • 2012 Masters: Indian Wells QF
    • 2012 titles: Sao Paulo, Nice
    • career finals: 12-6 (2 ATP500s)
    • Masters: 1 SF
    • Slams: 3 QFs

    13. Fish

    • Started 2012 at: 8
    • During 2012: Nos. 8-13
    • Top 10 in 2012: 22 weeks
    • 2012 win-loss: 10-8
    • 2012 slams: R64 / – / R16
    • 2012 Masters: Miami QF
    • 2012 titles: –
    • career finals: 6-14
    • Masters: 4 RU, 2 SFs
    • Slam: 3 QFs

    Weeks in Top 10:

    • 30: Tipsarevic
    • 22: Fish
    • 20: Del Potro
    • 11: Isner
    • 5: Almagro
    • 1: Monaco

    If Fish’s fitness has stabilised after a troubled year so far, should we expect him to regain his usual place in the top 10 with Tipsarevic and Del Potro?

    2012 win-loss:

    • Almagro: 46-15
    • Del Potro 40-10
    • Tipsarevic: 39-15
    • Monaco 31-10
    • Isner 30-13
    • Fish: 10-8

    Almagro has played the most in 2012, has won two titles, yet has slipped from the top 10

    Titles in 2012:

    • 3: Monaco
    • 2: Tipsarevic, Del Potro, Almagro
    • 1: Isner
    • 0: Fish

    As well as having the most titles, Monaco is the only of these players to have won an ATP500 this year

    Career finals:

    • Almagro: 12-6
    • Del Potro: 11-5
    • Fish: 6-14
    • Monaco: 6-9
    • Isner: 4-7
    • Tipsarevic: 3-7

    Almagro has the most titles; also of his 6 lost finals, 5 were to Ferrer. Del Potro obviously stands out as the only one with a Grand Slam title. Fish similarly stands out for having reached 4 Masters finals, which he lost to Roddick, Federer and Djokovic (twice)

    Conclusions:

    Isner (up 7 places since 2011) has the best Masters result of the six, but the worst record in the 3 slams, with a 3-3 record, and second lowest number of titles. The most inconsistent of the six

    Tipsarevic (up 1 place) has had the most consistent year, and has spent all of 2012 in the Top 10. At the slams he has not reached a QF.

    Monaco (up 16 places) has built his rise on success at the less fashionable clay tournaments (cf Almagro and, to a degree, Ferrer) plus a SF at Miami

    Fish (down 5 places) has played the least of the six, thanks to a variety of health problems. His pedigree – he has the best ATP1000s results, and his slam record is second only to Del Potro – would suggest that his place in the top 10 is dependent only on his health. He and Del Potro are the only ones of the six to have been ranked higher than No.8

    Almagro (down 2 places) has had a better slam record than Tipsarevic and has won as many titles, but has only reached one Masters QF. He has been very busy in 2012, and defending a lot of points in the process. However in the rest of 2012 he will only be defending 380 of 2,545 ranking points, so maybe we should expect a rise through the rest of the year?

    Del Potro (up 2 places) has by far the best slam record of this six in 2012, and indeed in his career. In 2011 he had an indifferent summer – R32 at US Open and at Cincinnati and Canada Masters, and a worse autumn: he didn’t play at either the Shanghai or Paris Masters, and then lost both his singles ties in the Davis Cup final against Spain. Given his proven talent, his generally steady performance so far in 2012 and his having only 360 of 3,180 points to defend in the rest of 2012, surely the time has come for him to break out of this 8-13 bracket and challenge Berdych, Tsonga and Ferrer in the heart of the Top 10.

    Blog index

     

    The Top 12 rearranged by results in Grand Slams

    The current top twelve players in order of their Grand Slam results:

    Top_12_by_gs

    The four things worth mentioning are

    • Thanks to his 2009 US Open title, Del Potro jumps up a long way
    • Ferrer is the only one to have reached SFs and not won one
    • Isner, Tipsarevic and Gilles Simon are very firmly rooted to the bottom of the chart
    • Murray, as often seems when comparing records, is in a weird class of his own, having reached more finals than Tsonga, Berdych and Del Potro put together

    Blog index

     

    The Top Four’s dominance of the Masters Series tournaments

    15 currently-active players have won a Masters title:

    • Ferrero (4) – Rome 2001, Monte Carlo 2002, 2003, Madrid 2004
    • Haas (1) – Stuttgart Indoor 2001 (became Madrid / Shanghai)
    • Hewitt (2) – Indian Wells 2002, 2003
    • Federer (20) – Hamburg 2002….
    • Roddick (5) – Canada 2003, Cincinnati 2003, 2006 Miami 2004, 2010
    • Nadal (21) – Monte Carlo 2005….
    • Berdych (1) – Paris 2005
    • Robredo (1) – Hamburg 2006
    • Davydenko (3) – Paris 2006, Miami 2008, Madrid 2009
    • Djokovic (11) – Miami 2007….
    • Nalbandian (2) – Madrid 2007, Paris 2007
    • Murray (8) – Cincinnati 2008….
    • Tsonga (1) – Paris 2008
    • Ljubicic (1) – Indian Wells 2010
    • Soderling (1) – Paris 2010

    Of the 66 Masters held since Nadal’s first Masters title at Monte Carlo in 2005, only 12 (18%) have been won by a player other than the top 4.

    7 of these 12 were at end-of-season autumn indoor tournaments:

    • Paris 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010
    • Madrid 2007, 2009

    Only 5 of those 12 were from the main pre-US Open part of the season, ie just 5 of 55 outdoor tournaments:

    • Hamburg 2006 (Robredo)
    • Cincinnati 2006 (Roddick)
    • Miami 2008 (Davydenko)
    • Miami 2010 (Roddick)
    • Indian Wells 2010 (Ljubicic)

      Two months shy of his 30th birthday, Roddick is the youngest of that quartet. 

      Success rates of the top 4 since each won their 1st title (US hard-clay-autumn)

      • Federer: 22% – 20 wins from 91 Masters since Hamburg ’02  (12-6-2)
      • Nadal: 32% – 21 wins from 66 Masters since Monte Carlo ’05 (4-16-1)
      • Djokovic: 22% – 11 wins from 49 Masters since Miami ’07 (7-3-1)
      • Murray: 23% – 8 wins from 35 Masters since Cincinnati ’08 (5-0-3)

      Blog index

       

      Andy Murray’s time in the top 4

      Murray reached the top 4 in Sep 2008. He is still number four, but sometimes has been no.3, four times has slipped to no.5, and once briefly reached no.2

      • 08 Sep ’08 – No.4 for 32 weeks
      • 11 May ’09 – No.3 for 12 weeks
      • 17 Aug ’09 – No.2 for 3 weeks
      • 14 Sep ’09 – No.3 for 5 weeks
      • 19 Oct ’09 – No.4 for 12 weeks
      • 11 Jan ’10 – No.5 for 1 week (Del Potro no.4)
      • 18 Jan ’10 – No.4 for 1 week
      • 01 Feb ’10 – No.3 for 2 weeks
      • 15 Feb ’10 – No.4 for 4 weeks
      • 22 Mar ’10 – No.3 for 1 week
      • 05 Apr ’10 – No.4 for 2 weeks
      • 19 Apr ’10 – No.5 for 2 weeks (Del Potro no.4)
      • 03 May ’10 – No.4 for 26 weeks
      • 15 Nov ’10 – No.5 for 2 weeks (Soderling no.4)
      • 29 Nov ’10 – No.4 for 6 weeks
      • 10 Jan ’11 – No.5 for 9 weeks (Soderling no.4)
      • 04 Apr ’11 – No.4 for 25 weeks
      • 17 Oct ’11 – No.3 for 6 weeks
      • 28 Nov ’11 – No.4 for 29 weeks

      The periods away from No.4 are so short as to be scarcely worth analysing. His arrival there in Sep ’08 was with the points he gained by reaching the US Open final. A month prior to that he won the Cincinnati Masters while ranked no.9

      His week at No.5 in Jan ’10 coincided with the Australian Open draw: to reach the final that year he had to beat Nadal in the QFs (and Cilic in the SFs) Del Potro’s 3 weeks at No.4 were with points from his 2009 US Open title.

      His 11 weeks at No.5 after Nov 2010 were just after Soderling won the Paris Masters and had still points from his 2nd appearance in a French Open final.

        In total 181 weeks have past since Murray reached the top 4:

        • 3 weeks at No.2 (2%)
        • 26 weeks at No.3 (14%)
        • 138 weeks at No.4 (76%)
        • 14 weeks at No.5 (8%)

        Blog index

         

        The eleven ATP finals of John Isner

        John Isner has reached eleven ATP tour finals, compiling a 4-7 record

        2007

        • Washington – lost to Roddick (ranked 5)

        2010

        • Auckland
        • Memphis 500 – lost to Querrey (31)
        • Belgrade – lost to Querrey (22)
        • Atlanta – lost to Fish (49)

        2011

        • Newport
        • Atlanta – lost to Fish (9)
        • Winston-Salem

        2012

        • Indian Wells Masters – lost to Federer (3)
        • Houston – lost to Monaco (16)
        • Newport

        All four of his victories have been at a tournament held in a week adjacent to a Grand Slam:

        2010 Auckland

        • week before Australian Open
        • ranking of 8th seed: 31 (Montanes)
        • ranking of defeated finalist: 67 (Clement)

        2011 Newport

        • week after Wimbledon
        • ranking of 8th seed: 83 (Kamke)
        • ranking of defeated finalist: 73 (Rochus)

        2011 Winston-Salem

        • week before US Open
        • ranking of 8th seed: 40 (Baghdatis)
        • ranking of defeated finalist: 113 (Benneteau)

        2012 Newport

        • week after Wimbledon
        • ranking of 8th seed: 53 (Muller)
        • ranking of defeated finalist: 223 (Hewitt)

        Details taken from the list of Isner’s finals on Wikipedia and his page on the ATP site

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        Comparing the career arcs of five 30-ish players

        At Wimbledon this year there were a high number of 30-something players in the men’s singles draw, most notably the champion, Federer. When Federer first won Wimbledon in 2003 he played Roddick in the semifinals. During that tournament, at least up until Federer’s straight sets victory, more noise was being made in the media about Roddick than Federer. Roddick was a year younger than Federer, and later that year’s US Open drew himself level with Federer at one slam title each. Briefly, for nine weeks at the end of that year he was world number one, before Federer took over in February 2004. Also in the top 3 then was JC Ferrero, who had won the 2003 French Open, now 32 years old and ranked 37.

        Davydenko is a couple of months older than Federer. At Wimbledon 2003 he was the 33rd seed and lost in the first round. Later in the decade he became a permanent fixture in the top ten.

        David Ferrer and Nicolas Mahut were both born between Federer and Roddick. Ferrer is now well established in the top ten, regularly reaching slam QFs and winning ATP250 and ATP500 titles. His route to this level has been very slow and steady, with only a slight hiccup. Mahut has never been anywhere near the top ten: briefly he was in the top 50, at his peak in 2007. He took a long time to mature, and his ranking soon fell away again. However he is having something of an indian summer.

        The curve of rankings for all of these players has had a double peak. Those of Federer, Ferrer and Mahut are happening right now. Davydenko’s and Roddick’s seem firmly in the past.

        Five_30_year_old_players

        The interesting moment here is July 2008 when Federer, Davydenko, Ferrer and Roddick were all in the top six, aged about 26. This was the moment when Federer was just about to lose his no.1 ranking to Nadal for the first time, having lost the Wimbledon final. He regained it a year later after winning the French Open, but then had an extended period as first Nadal and then Djokovic occupied the top position. We shall see how long this new reign of Federer’s is. Given that his lead over Djokovic is a tiny 75 points, a period of fluctuation could be reasonably expected.

        Roddick hung onto his top ten ranking for another year, but has slipped since then. 2008 was towards the end of his half-decade or so at the top of the game. His peak patch (2003-9) overlapped with Davydenko’s (2005-2010) and only co-incidences with Ferrer’s Sep 07- Oct 08 spurt, which started with his SF at USO 2007 and winning Tokyo the next month, and ended when he failed to defend these points. Ferrer’s position in the top ten since Oct 2010 has been based on solid year round results. Like Almagro, but to an even greater degree, he is a very reliable performer at ATP 250 and ATP 500 competitions at which he is the top seed. 

        Roughly speaking Roddick was an early bloomer, and Ferrer a late developer, with Davydenko somewhere in between. This differences perhaps have a parallel in their varying styles of play and approach to the game. Certainly there is a difference in the their accomplishments in the game’s top tournaments:

        • Roddick: 1 GS title, 4 GS runner-up, 5 Masters titles
        • Davydenko: 1 Year End Championship, 3 Masters titles
        • Ferrer: none, as yet: 0-1 in YEC finals; 0-3 in Masters finals; 0-3 in GS SFs

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        Tim Mayotte

        Tim Mayotte was a tall American serve-and-volley player, probably best known to British fans. 

        He reached a QF and a SF at the Australian Open, and a QF at the US Open, but enjoyed the bulk of his success at Wimbledon: in 11 visits he reached a SF, 5 x QF, 3 x 4R. In 1987 and 1988 he finished the year in the top 10.

        In the 1980s Wimbledon seeds were still determined by a committee and Mayotte’s grass court record ensured respectful seeding for him. For example in 1990 he was the 6th seed while ranked no.14. Usually he survived until he faced one of the top players. Here are some of the players who beat him:

        • 1982 – McEnroe
        • 1983 – Curren
        • 1984 – Connors
        • 1985 – Becker
        • 1986 – Lendl
        • 1988 – Lendl
        • 1989 – Edberg

        His final visit to Wimbledon was in 1991, ranked 92. Nonetheless he reached the R16 once again, falling to Guy Forget, who was the world no.8 at the time.

        He appeared a few times at Queens as well, winning the trophy in 1986. He faced Connors in the final, having beaten Woodforde, Pate, Becker and Edberg en route.

        Between 1985 and 1989 he won 12 titles, all on quick surfaces, eight indoors.

        At the 1988 Seoul Olympics he won the silver medal, losing to Mecir in the final.

        His wikipedia page is here and his ATP profile here.

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        Ferrer on clay in 2012

        Here are all the clay-court ATP tournaments scheduled for 2012. All those in bold are ones Ferrer played:

        Hard courts: Auckland (W) Australian Open (QF)

        • Vina del Mar
        • Davis Cup
        • Sao Paulo
        • Buenos Aires (W)
        • Acapulco 500  (W)

        Four weeks of American hard court Masters: Indian Wells (R32) Miami (QF)

        • Davis Cup (2-0)
        • Houston, Casablanca
        • Monte Carlo Masters (R32)
        • Bucharest, Barcelona 500 (RU)
        • Munich, Belgrade, Estoril
        • Madrid Masters (QF)
        • Rome Masters (SF)
        • Nice, World Team Cup
        • ROLAND GARROS (SF)

        Four weeks of grass: ‘s-Hertogenbosch (W) Wimbledon (QF)

        • Stuttgart, Umag, Bastad (W)
        • Hamburg 500, Gstaad (withdrawn)
        • Kitzbuhel

        In total he played eight clay-court tournaments, with a win-loss of 30-5. For comparison, Nadal played five: Monte Carlo, Barcelona, Madrid, Rome and Roland Garros (going 23-1)

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